Skip to Content

Agenda

Saturday, September 17, 2011

AM

7:00 Registration, Breakfast & Exhibits

8:00 Welcome & Introduction – Charles Heise, MD and Terrence Frick, MD

Session I

8:10 GERD: Medical Therapy or Surgical Referral? – Deepak Gopal, MD

8:25 Bariatric Surgery: When should it be Recommended? – Michael Garren, MD

8:40 Bariatric Surgery: Effects on Health and Diabetes – Guilherme Campos, MD

8:55 Celiac Disease and its Spectrum of Disorders: Don’t Miss the Boat! – Terrence Frick, MD

9:10 What is Chronic Pancreatitis? – Mark Benson, MD

9:25 Panel Discussion

9:55 Break & Exhibits

Session II

10:10 Hepatitis B Breakthroughs – Michael Lucey, MD

10:25 New Fronteirs in Hepatitis C – Adnan Said, MD

10:40 Women’s Health Issues in Digestive Diseases – Sumona Saha, MD

10:55 Inflammatory Bowel Disease Crohn’s/Ulcerative Colitis

  • GI – Mark Reichelderfer, MD
  • Radiologic Imaging – Meghan Lubner, MD
  • Surgical Considerations – Bruce Harms, MD

11:25 Panel Discussion

12:00 Lunch & Exhibits

PM

Session III

Colon and Rectal Cancer Multidisciplinary Case Conference

Colon Cancer Case
1:00 GI/Colonoscopy – Jennifer Weiss, MD

1:10 Radiology/CT Colonography – Perry Pickhardt, MD

1:20 Surgical Resection – Chip Foley, MD

1:30 Oncology Treatment and Appropriate Follow-up – Sam Lubner, MD

Rectal Cancer Case
1:40 Staging: TRUS and MRI – David Kim, MD

1:50 Surgical Options – Gregory Kennedy, MD, Phd

2:00 A Few Words About Stomas – Charles Heise, MD

2:10 Case Discussion

2:30 Break & Exhibits

Session IV

2:45 IBS: Nuts and Bolts – Siobhan Byrne, MD

3:00 How to Approach Chronic Constipation – Anurag Soni, MD

3:15 C. difficile Colitis: An Update – Ryan De Lee, MD

3:30 Probiotics: What Should we Know? – Nasia Safdar, MD

3:45 Fecal Incontinence: A Surgical Perspective – Charles Heise, MD

4:00 Anal Fistula/Abscess – Chip Foley, MD

4:15 Panel Discussion

4:45 Closing Remarks – Charles Heise, MD

Adjourn


webmaster@surgery.wisc.edu Copyright © 2016 The Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System