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Bruce A Harms, MD, MBA

Contact Dr. Harms

E-mail:
harms@surgery.wisc.edu

Phone:
(608) 263-2521

Mail:
600 HIGHLAND AVE
BX7375 CLINICAL SCIENCE CNTR-H4
MADISON, WI 53792-3284

Bruce A Harms, MD, MBA

Professor
Section of Colorectal Surgery
Division of General Surgery

Education

  • MD, University of Nebraska Medical School, Omaha, NE, 1977
  • Residency, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI, 1977-1980, 1981-1983
  • Research Fellow, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA, 1980-1981
  • Senior Registrar, Surgery, Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, Gloucester, England, 1983-1984

Clinical Specialties

Dr. Harms is certified by the American Board of Surgery with a certificate of added qualifications in surgical critical care. Dr. Harms is the chief of the Department of Surgery’s section of colorectal surgery and vice-chief of the Division of General Surgery. Dr. Harms specializes in colorectal surgery with special interests in inflammatory bowel disease and reconstructive colorectal surgery.

Dr. Harms provides a wide range of services including Abdominoperineal Resection, Abscess Drainage, Appendectomy, Endorectal Advancement Flap, Excision / Fulguration of Condyloma, Fistulotomy, Flap Repair, Hemorrhoid Banding, Hemorrhoidectomy, Ileal Pouch Reconstruction, Ileocolic Resection, Laparoscopic and Open Partial Colectomy, Laparoscopic and Open Rectopexy, Laparoscopic and Open Sigmoid Resection, Laparoscopic and Open Total Colectomy, Laparoscopic Groin Hernia Repair, Lateral Internal Sphincterotomy, Lower Anterior Resection (LAR), Open Groin Hernia Repair, Pilonidal Cyst Excision, (show all).

Research Interests

Dr. Harms maintains a basic science laboratory that investigates the pulmonary microcirculation and pathophysiology of post-traumatic pulmonary injury. Clinical research projects include the factors important for successful reconstructive surgery for inflammatory bowel disease.

Recent Publications
  • Postoperative complications in patients with rectal cancer are associated with delays in chemotherapy that lead to worse disease-free and overall survival.
    Tevis SE, Kohlnhofer BM, Stringfield S, Foley EF, Harms BA, Heise CP, Kennedy GD
    Dis. Colon Rectum 2013 Dec; 56(12):1339-48.
    [PubMed ID: 24201387, PMC ID: 3884512]
    More Information
  • Predictors of mortality after emergent surgery for acute colonic diverticulitis: analysis of National Surgical Quality Improvement Project data.
    Ballian N, Rajamanickam V, Harms BA, Foley EF, Heise CP, Greenberg CC, Kennedy GD
    J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2013 Feb; 74(2):611-6.
    [PubMed ID: 23354259]
    More Information
  • Comparable postoperative morbidity and mortality after laparoscopic and open emergent restorative colectomy: outcomes from the ACS NSQIP.
    Ballian N, Weisensel N, Rajamanickam V, Foley EF, Heise CP, Harms BA, Kennedy GD
    World J Surg 2012 Oct; 36(10):2488-96.
    [PubMed ID: 22736343]
    More Information
  • Visceral obesity is associated with outcomes of total mesorectal excision for rectal adenocarcinoma.
    Ballian N, Lubner MG, Munoz A, Harms BA, Heise CP, Foley EF, Kennedy GD
    J Surg Oncol 2012 Mar 15; 105(4):365-70.
    [PubMed ID: 21751219]
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  • Computed tomographic colonography.
    Philip AK, Lubner MG, Harms B
    Surg. Clin. North Am. 2011 Feb; 91(1):127-39.
    [PubMed ID: 21184904]
    More Information

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