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Authors Hoehn RS, Singhal A, Wima K, Sutton JM, Paterno F, Steve Woodle E, Hohmann S, Abbott DE, Shah SA
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Journal Liver Int. Volume: 35 Issue: 7 Pages: 1902-9
Publish Date 2015 Jul
PubMed ID 25533420
Abstract

We sought to analyse the effect of pretransplant diabetes on post-operative outcomes and resource utilization following liver transplantation.A retrospective cohort study was designed using a linkage between the University HealthSystem Consortium and Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients databases. We identified 12 442 patients who underwent liver transplantation at 63 centres from 2007-2011 and separated cohorts of patients with diabetes (n = 2971; 24%) and without (n = 9471; 76%) at the time of transplant. We analysed transplant related outcomes and short-term survival.Diabetic recipients were more likely to be male (70% vs 67%), non-white (32% vs 26%), older (age ≥60; 41% vs 28%), and have a higher BMI (29 vs 27; P < 0.001). More diabetic patients were on haemodialysis (10% vs 7%), had cirrhosis caused by NASH (24% vs 9%; P < 0.001), and received liver allografts from older donors (≥ 60 years; 19% vs 15%) with a higher donor risk index (>1.49; 46% vs 42%; P < 0.001). Post-transplant, diabetic recipients had longer hospital length of stay (10 vs 9 days), higher peri-transplant mortality (5% vs 4%) and 30-day readmission rates (41% vs 37%), were less often discharged to home (83% vs 87%; P < 0.05), and had inferior graft and patient survival. Liver transplant was more expensive for type 1 vs type 2 diabetics ($105 078 vs $100 624, P < 0.001). Poorly controlled diabetic recipients were less likely discharged home following transplant (75% vs 82%, P < 0.01).This national study indicates that pretransplant diabetes is associated with inferior post-operative outcomes and increased resource utilization after liver transplantation.

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