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John E. Scarborough, MD

Surgical Services

Contact Dr. Scarborough

E-mail:
scarborough@surgery.wisc.edu

Phone:
(608) 265-3982

Mail:
600 Highland Avenue
MC 3236
Madison, WI 53792

Fax:
(608) 262-9746

John E. Scarborough, MD

Associate Professor
Vice Chair for Quality, Department of Surgery
Division of Trauma, Acute Care Surgery, Burn and Surgical Critical Care
Divisions of General Surgery

Education

  • MD, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, 1998
  • General Surgery Residency, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, 2005
  • Surgical Critical Care Fellowship, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, 2006
  • Abdominal Transplant Fellowship, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, 2007

Clinical Specialties

Dr. Scarborough is certified by the American Board of Surgery in Surgery and Surgical Critical Care. He specializes in emergency surgery (Acute Care Surgery), general surgery, laparoscopic surgery, lower GI (colorectal, small bowel), surgical critical care, trauma (abdominal trauma, thoracic trauma, traumatic brain injury) and upper GI surgery (hepatobiliary, stomach, esophagus).

Dr. Scarborough provides a wide range of services including Appendectomy, Cholecystectomy (Gallbladder Removal), Excision of Lipoma, Laparoscopic Groin Hernia Repair, Muscle Biopsy, Open Groin Hernia Repair, Sebaceous Cyst Removal, Subcutaneous Tumor Removal, Trauma Surgery, and Ventral / Abdominal Hernia Repair.

Research Interests

Dr. Scarborough’s research interest is in health services research.

Recent Publications
  • Current use and outcomes of helicopter transport in pediatric trauma: a review of 18,291 transports.
    Englum BR, Rialon KL, Kim J, Shapiro ML, Scarborough JE, Rice HE, Adibe OO, Tracy ET
    J. Pediatr. Surg. 2016 Oct 27.
    [PubMed ID: 27852453]
    More Information
  • Insurance status and race affect treatment and outcome of traumatic brain injury.
    McQuistion K, Zens T, Jung HS, Beems M, Leverson G, Liepert A, Scarborough J, Agarwal S
    J. Surg. Res. 2016 Oct; 205(2):261-71.
    [PubMed ID: 27664871]
    More Information
  • Management of blunt pancreatic trauma in children: Review of the National Trauma Data Bank.
    Englum BR, Gulack BC, Rice HE, Scarborough JE, Adibe OO
    J. Pediatr. Surg. 2016 Sep; 51(9):1526-31.
    [PubMed ID: 27577183]
    More Information
  • Nonoperative Management Is as Effective as Immediate Splenectomy for Adult Patients with High-Grade Blunt Splenic Injury.
    Scarborough JE, Ingraham AM, Liepert AE, Jung HS, O'Rourke AP, Agarwal SK
    J. Am. Coll. Surg. 2016 Aug; 223(2):249-58.
    [PubMed ID: 27112125]
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  • Which Complications Matter Most? Prioritizing Quality Improvement in Emergency General Surgery.
    Scarborough JE, Schumacher J, Pappas TN, McCoy CC, Englum BR, Agarwal SK, Greenberg CC
    J. Am. Coll. Surg. 2016 Apr; 222(4):515-24.
    [PubMed ID: 26916129, PMC ID: 5131647]
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  • 1143: SOCIOECONOMIC DISPARITIES IN THE TREATMENT OF TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY (TBI).
    McQuistion K, Jung HS, Zens T, Beems M, Liepert A, O'Rourke A, Scarborough J, Agarwal S
    Crit. Care Med. 2015 Dec; 43(12 Suppl 1):287.
    [PubMed ID: 26570804]
    More Information
  • Validated prediction model for severe groin wound infection after lower extremity revascularization procedures.
    Bennett KM, Levinson H, Scarborough JE, Shortell CK
    J. Vasc. Surg. 2016 Feb; 63(2):414-9.
    [PubMed ID: 26526055]
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  • Leukopenia is associated with worse but not prohibitive outcomes following emergent abdominal surgery.
    Gulack BC, Englum BR, Lo DD, Nussbaum DP, Keenan JE, Scarborough JE, Shapiro ML
    J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2015 Sep; 79(3):437-43.
    [PubMed ID: 26307878, PMC ID: 4805422]
    More Information
  • Reply to Letter: "Failure-to-pursue Rescue: Truly a Failure?".
    Scarborough JE, Pappas TN, Bennett KM, Lagoo-Deenadayalan SA
    Ann. Surg. 2015 Aug; 262(2):e44.
    [PubMed ID: 26164434]
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  • Combined Mechanical and Oral Antibiotic Bowel Preparation Reduces Incisional Surgical Site Infection and Anastomotic Leak Rates After Elective Colorectal Resection: An Analysis of Colectomy-Targeted ACS NSQIP.
    Scarborough JE, Mantyh CR, Sun Z, Migaly J
    Ann. Surg. 2015 Aug; 262(2):331-7.
    [PubMed ID: 26083870]
    More Information

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