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Peter F Nichol, MD, PhD

Contact Dr. Nichol

E-mail:
nichol@surgery.wisc.edu

Phone:
(608) 263-9419

Mail:
600 HIGHLAND AVENUE
BX7375 CLINICAL SCIENCE CNTR-H4
MADISON, WI 53792

Peter F Nichol, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor
Division of Pediatric Surgery

Education

  • Medical School, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 1997
  • PhD, Doctorate in Neurosciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, 1997
  • Residency, General Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, 1998-1999
  • General Surgery, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI, 1999-2003
  • Fellowship, Pediatric Surgery, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, 2003-2005

Clinical Specialties

Dr. Nichol is certified by the American Board of Surgery in General Surgery and Pediatric Surgery. He specializes in all types of pediatric surgical cases and has a special interest in children with short gut syndrome otherwise known as intestinal failure. He’s also interested in the development of the intestine and in birth defects involving the intestine and the abdominal wall. He specializes in minimally invasive surgery and is Director of the Short Gut Program at American Family Children’s Hospital as well as a member of the Nutrition Support Team.

For a complete listing of conditions our pediatric surgeons provide treatment for, please click here.

Research Interests

Dr. Nichol’s laboratory research focuses on intestinal development with a goal of developing therapies that will enable growth of the gut in patients with intestinal failure. He has an NIH funded lab and is the 2013 Stanley J. Dudrick Research Award Recipient.

Recent Publications
  • Exogenous Sonic hedgehog protein does not rescue cultured intestine from atresia formation.
    Reeder AL, Zaremba KM, Liebl RM, Kowalkowski A, Nichol PF
    J. Surg. Res. 2014 Mar; 187(1):14-8.
    [PubMed ID: 24393341, PMC ID: 3943772]
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  • Utility and limits of Hprt-Cre technology in generating mutant mouse embryos.
    Zaremba KM, Reeder AL, Kowalkowski A, Girma E, Nichol PF
    J. Surg. Res. 2014 Apr; 187(2):386-93.
    [PubMed ID: 24360120, PMC ID: 3959277]
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  • Haploinsufficiency of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 decreases the severity and incidence of duodenal atresia in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2IIIb-/- mouse model.
    Reeder AL, Botham RA, Zaremba KM, Nichol PF
    Surgery 2012 Oct; 152(4):768-75; discussion 775-6.
    [PubMed ID: 23021139, PMC ID: 3665403]
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  • Muscle patterning in mouse and human abdominal wall development and omphalocele specimens of humans.
    Nichol PF, Corliss RF, Yamada S, Shiota K, Saijoh Y
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 2012 Dec; 295(12):2129-40.
    [PubMed ID: 22976993, PMC ID: 3976953]
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  • Formation of duodenal atresias in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2IIIb-/- mouse embryos occurs in the absence of an endodermal plug.
    Botham RA, Franco M, Reeder AL, Lopukhin A, Shiota K, Yamada S, Nichol PF
    J. Pediatr. Surg. 2012 Jul; 47(7):1369-79.
    [PubMed ID: 22813799, PMC ID: 3401378]
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