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Authors Ebaugh JL, Matsumura JS, Morasch MD, Pearce WH, Nemcek AA, Yao JS
Lab(s)
Journal Vasc Endovascular Surg Volume: 37 Issue: 1 Pages: 23-6
Publish Date 2003 Jan-Feb
PubMed ID 12577135
Abstract

This study intended to determine the precise diameter of the popliteal artery in patients at risk for popliteal aneurysms. Accurate sizing is necessary to develop devices for endovascular treatment of popliteal aneurysms. Fifty-four patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) had computed tomography (CT) scans of the popliteal arteries. Age- and gender-matched control subjects were measured by ultrasound. NIH Image was used to measure the minor diameter at the adductor hiatus (proximal) and femoral condyles (midpopliteal artery). There were 4 unsuspected popliteal aneurysms (7.4%). The proximal popliteal artery was ectatic in these patients: 13.4 +/- 5.2 mm. Proximal and midpopliteal arteries were significantly larger in the other patients with AAAs compared with controls: 9.6 +/- 1.8 mm vs 7.9 +/- 1.1 mm at the hiatus (p<0.001) and 10.2 +/- 2 mm vs 7.9 +/- 0.9 mm at the condyles (p<0.001). The popliteal artery was focally larger in patients with AAAs without popliteal aneurysms. The popliteal artery was larger in men compared with women; 9.8 +/- 1.8 mm vs 8.8 +/- 1.9 mm at the hiatus (p=0.024) and 10.5 +/- 1.9 mm vs 9.0 +/- 2.4 mm at the condyles (p=0.005). The proximal popliteal artery was 2 mm larger in patients at risk for popliteal aneurysms and 5 mm larger in patients with popliteal aneurysms compared to controls. Focal ectasia of the midpopliteal artery was common. Planning for endovascular treatment of popliteal aneurysms must incorporate this striking enlargement.

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