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Authors Kim Y, Chang AL, Wima K, Ertel AE, Diwan TS, Abbott DE, Shah SA
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Journal Surgery
Publish Date 2016 Aug 26
PubMed ID 27574775
Abstract

A growing number of renal transplant recipients have a body mass index ≥40. While previous studies have shown that patient and graft survival are significantly decreased in renal transplant recipients with body mass indexes ≥40, less is known about perioperative outcomes and resource utilization in morbidly obese patients. We aimed to analyze the effects of morbid obesity on these parameters in renal transplant.Using a linkage between the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients and the databases of the University HealthSystem Consortium, we identified 29,728 adult renal transplant recipients and divided them into 2 cohorts based on body mass index (<40 vs ≥40 kg/m(2)). The body mass index ≥40 group comprised 2.5% (n = 747) of renal transplant recipients studied.Body mass index ≥40 recipients incurred greater direct costs ($84,075 vs $79,580, P < .01), index admission costs ($91,169 vs $86,141, P < .01), readmission costs ($5,306 vs $4,596, P = .01), and combined costs ($99,590 vs $93,939, P < .001). Thirty-day readmission rates were also greater among body mass index ≥40 recipients (33.92% vs 26.9%, P < .01). Morbid obesity was not predictive of stay (odds ratio 1.01, P = .75).Morbidly obese renal transplant recipients incur greater costs and readmission rates compared with nonobese patients. Recognition of increased resource utilization should be accompanied by appropriate, risk-adjustment reimbursement.

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